Friday, 30 April 2010

Arizona immigration law fallout

Emotions in Arizona remain heated, where reaction to the border state's new law that promises a crackdown on illegal immigrants has reached a near boiling point. Jon Decker reports.

USA-ARIZONA IMMIGRATION LAW - Emotions in Arizona remain heated, where a new law requires state and local police to determine a person's immigration status if there is "reasonable suspicion" they are undocumented.

Arizona State Senator Russell Pearce, is the bill's author.

SENATOR RUSSELL PEARCE ON THE BORDER, SAYING:

"This is not only a national security issue, but once they cross that border, it is our neighborhoods, our health care, it is our criminal justice system, it is our educational system, it is our responsibility to our system and our citizens to protect and serve. We intend to enforce the law here in Arizona."

A recent Rasmussen Reports poll found that almost two-thirds of voters in the Arizona favored the measure.

LISA CUMMINGS, PHOENIX ARIZONA, ON THE LAW, SAYING:

"I know a lot of people who come over the border to have babies, so that they can stay in this country. They don't have to pay their insurance to have their baby. I pay insurance. Why is that fair for them and not me."

But critics say the law is unconstitutional and opens the door to racial profiling.

TONY ZUNIGA, PHOENIX, ARIZONA, ON THE LAW, SAYING:

"It is not what America is about. It is not what our history is about. I am totally American and I totally believe in the American way. I don't believe in discrimination, I don't believe in hating people, this was not the right route to take."

The law, which also makes it a crime to transport illegal immigrants and to hire day laborers off the street, has already had an impact on those looking for work.

GABRIEL ESTORREZ, FROM PHOENIX, ARIZONA, ON HOW THE LAW IS IMPACTING HIM, SAYING:

"I only came here for the job. The police, sometimes there is too much problems. The sheriff, you watch him, if you are hispanic, you need your I.D., your papers. It is too much problems for this. I do not know."

There are some 11 million illegal immigrants living and working in the United States, an estimated 460,000 of them in Arizona.

Jon Decker, Reuters.